High Water installation at Terrain Exhibitions

I'm very honoured to have been selected as the inaugural artist of the Terrain-HATCH Public Art Residency in collaboration with Terrain Exhibitions and the Chicago Artist Coalition. I have been working closely with curator Kate Pollasch, the Terrain-HATCH Public Art Curatorial Resident, to conceive this project, and will be presenting the work on Sunday, February 5, 2017, from 2:00–5:00 p.m. at Terrain Exhibitions, located at 705 Highland Avenue, Oak Park, IL. For more details about the work and the Public Art Residency, please see the attached press release.

Kate Hampel, High Water, 2017

Kate Hampel, High Water, 2017

Artist in Residence at LATITUDE

September sends some of us back to school and some of us elsewhere... this morning I packed up my backpack and started my month as Artist in Residence at LATITUDE! I'm getting tech-y with the wide-format printers, colour-testing new fabrics, and printing by the bolt for two shows coming up this fall. 

I'll be there varying days throughout the week, Fridays and Saturdays all day. Stop by and say hello!

Day one test strips.

Day one test strips.

Images on knit fabric.

Images on knit fabric.

Unfinished Work

Occasionally life and practice intersect in ways that seem almost too tidy. On a recent trip home I was digging through boxes of my grandmother's things, still unsorted as no one knows what to do with them. My dad wanted to give me some cross stitching she'd done, as he didn't know what else to do with them and giving things to me is the standard response to that (in the best of ways). 

Images from the 2009 series Now Look What You've Done, featuring things given to me by my mother and father.

Images from the 2009 series Now Look What You've Done, featuring things given to me by my mother and father.

The cross stitchings were large; they were clearly cushion covers that my grandmother had never finished. Out of some sense of both obligation and delight I decided to take them home and finish them for her, fifty or sixty years later. As I sewed the zippers and piping I thought about that half-century divide between her labour and mine, and what it could mean to both of us as a strange, blind, collaborative effort--neither of us alive when the other completed their share of the work.

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SPECIAL BALLOT PROJECT

On July 20, 2015 the Ontario Court of Appeal ruled in favour of the Canadian government's suit to deny voting rights to Canadians who have lived abroad for more than 5 years. A Supreme Court case has been submitted to restore voting rights to all citizens, as this ruling is in opposition to the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, but in the mean time the election is happening without the voices of 1.4 million Canadian citizens residing abroad. The Special Ballot Project is a protest, and a rebuttal to supporters of the law who have said we don't have skin in the game, aren't really part of the country anymore, and shouldn't get a vote if we don't pay taxes.

Special ballots coming out of the printer in advance of the election!

Special ballots coming out of the printer in advance of the election!

Casting my protest vote in the Special Ballot Project-- for voting rights despite my 2737 days of residing in other countries, and for citizenship as a meaningful and permanent element of a democratic society.

Casting my protest vote in the Special Ballot Project-- for voting rights despite my 2737 days of residing in other countries, and for citizenship as a meaningful and permanent element of a democratic society.


Recent openings

The Textile Arts Factory in Thessaloniki, Greece.

The Textile Arts Factory in Thessaloniki, Greece.

I recently had work in two shows that I wasn't able to make it to: Who's Afraid of Feminism? at A.I.R. Gallery in Brooklyn, and a show at the Textile Arts Factory in Thessaloniki, Greece. 

Who's Afraid of Feminism? was curated by Catherine Morris, curator at the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, and she had great things to say about what it is to be part of a show like this (featuring work by self-identified women) in 2015:

"As we experience a profound shift in our understanding of the fluidity of gender identity, which is one of the defining features of this historical moment, feminism endures as a vital social, political and economic necessity. Artists included in Who's Afraid of Feminism address many of the most pressing social and cultural issues of our day--the mutability of gender constructions, marriage equality, body shaming, domestic violence, and culturally specific approaches to and priorities of feminism."